Selinde Lanier
Selinde Lanier

STATEMENT

Selinde started weaving after college, inspired by the Bauhaus weaving workshop of early 20th century Germany and the work of Guntha Stölzl and Anni Albers.  In graduate school, she focused on the interaction of textiles with light, weaving with materials such as fiber optic strands and stainless steel yarns and using weave structure to create openings and translucency in her fabrics. After completing her MFA at Savannah College of Art and Design in 2001, she worked for three years designing woven upholstery for the textile industry, gaining valuable experience learning to convert 2-D designs into woven fabric.  In 2010 she co-founded Flow Gallery in Marshall, NC with 7 other women and has exhibited her fine art wall hangings and fiber art there and in Asheville, as well as nationally from Georgia to California.  In 2017, her piece "Chrysalis" was selected for the Surface Design Association's Fiber Art VIII International Biennial.  

As a weaver and designer, Selinde was drawn to the doublewoven coverlet for its rare beauty, technical complexity and historical significance in American folk art. Her first years as a fine artist after leaving the textile industry were devoted exclusively to this structure, using natural dyes and the two layers of the coverlet’s woven field to weave a canvas of color in dialogue with itself. Most recently, however, she has been revisiting her interest in light’s interaction with fabric and using it to explore the relationship of the physical space that is our body to the spirit that inhabits it. By weaving a cloth of superfine metal and playing with its qualities of malleability, reflectiveness and translucence, she investigates the ways in which light as energy is transmuted by the textile she confronts it with. In her sculpture, photography and increasingly, works on paper, her work portrays a visible exoskeleton, the topography within and the invisible energy that moves through and around us.

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